Description
Wrap Around Long Skirt with Printed Flowers
A semi-formal fashion, in wearing this piece of ensemble is quite informal, casual and effortless, but graceful as it is this wrap is as much suited to a formal event or as office wear. Sufficiently skirting and with as much length, despite that it is open on one side, even when seated in an official meeting or bowing to work it keeps the legs covered.



Specifications:

Satin

Length 36 inch

Waist Upto 36 inch



In the contemporary life-mode when working young girls share a room, and sometimes also articles of day-today use, with its free size a wrapping skirt might also serve as a shared wear – one’s half-a-dozen becoming a dozen when shared with a friend’s half-a-dozen. Different from a sewn skirt in fashion since long, in Europe its early specimens seen in visual representations of Elizabethan era, and in India, since Indus days for some of the Indus terracotta figures are in contemporary skirt-type wear, this wrapping skirt is a later style. Like a sewn skirt it also has a hemispheric bottom – a circumference larger than that around the waist; however, it has one side unsewn. A larger length its one wide end overlaps the other, and the belt provided on the upper edge supports it on the waist. This belt, usually tailored from the same textile length as in this skirt, is now a regular feature of a wrapping skirt, some ethnic groups, especially those from the north-east, still use a running textile length skirting around the waist by locking its two ends using a self knot. This piece has been designed with polyester Satin fabric highly loved for its soft silken smooth surface, sheen that it radiates and its overall beauty. With the movement of body it gently surges like ripples of a rivulet descending down a mountain peak. The cloth-length used in fabricating this skirt has been richly printed with a large variety of multi-coloured design-patterns, mainly a wide range of fuchsia rose flowers. Worldwide loved for its rare beauty fuchsia has a glorious history. It was discovered in 1690s by a monk who was also a botanist on Caribbean island in Hispaniola, the modern Dominican Republic. Fuchsia has now 1100 varieties world over and there are many international florists supplying fuchsia flowers and as many nurseries supplying its plants.   This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of ancient India. Dr Daljeet is the chief curator of the Visual Arts Gallery at the National Museum of India, New Delhi. They have both collaborated on numerous books on Indian art and culture.

Lot 621

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