Description
Specifications:
Oil Painting on Canvas
Artist: Anup Gomay
36.00 inch X 48.00 inch

This painting, an imaginative visualization of the life-view of OmarKhayyam, the eleventh century Islamic scholar, poet and mathematicianof Persia, as reveals in his Rubayyat – quatrains, represents a Sheikhwith a glass of wine in his hand while with the other he is holding ayoung beauty passionately leaning upon his bosom. Beside her therelies a jar of wine along with a goblet, and a lyre. A galaxy ofbrilliant stars brightens the night but the lustrous waves of the bluecurling around the lovers are reflections of their own minds whichthis unique combination of wine, woman, music and passion – theessence of living as Omar Khayyam perceived it, breeds.Omar Khayyam, or Omar, the tent-maker, as the term ‘Khayyam’ literallymeans, said, ‘Enjoy wine and women and don’t be afraid, God hascompassion’; and still more, ‘And, if the wine you drink and lips youpress end in Nothing, all things end in nothing, then fancy, whilethou art, thou art (even if you drink and make love), but what, thoushalt be Nothing, thou shalt not be less’, that is, ‘Nothing’ can notreduce into anything less. He said that the dust alike stopped themouths of both, the sages and saints who discuss theology, and thosewho drink wine and press lips. He professed that the life’s tenure isbrief and hence use it more and more in enjoying it : ‘And, as Cockcrew, those who stood before the Tavern shouted “open the door ! youknow how little time we have to stay, and once departed, may return nomore”. Some discovered in Khayyam’s life-view pure hedonism, whileothers, a deep underlying mystique, the divine experience revealedthrough the ‘sensuous’. Hedonist or not, atheist or believer, and hisstatement has mystic dimensions or plain sensualism, the Rubayyat ofOmar Khayyam bred strong imagery effectively reproducible on thecanvas revealing mystique of flesh – the depth of the surface, andhence, the theme of many paintings, especially of post-miniature era.The painting has been rendered pursuing the idiom of modern art asprevailed around 1880-1900 A.D., especially, as practiced by artistsof Bengal who preferred treating realistically the persons, as alsothe themes, born of pure imagination, or those borrowed from othermediums, such as poetry. Even mythical beings or themes that theypainted looked like things of the other day. With its bold imageryrepresented in unambiguous diction, Omar Khayyam’s poetry won greaterfavour of a number of modern painters, especially those from Bengal.This contemporary work seeking to continue the great tradition ofcombining the realistic technique with the imaginative theme, notnecessarily based on this or that particular quatrain, represents OmarKhayyam’s broad life-view. Using the figures of a Sheikh-like lookingpassionate Arab clad in a blue gown and a turban dyed as in the colourof fire, and with a glass of wine in hand, each aspect endowed with ananalogical breadth of meaning, and a semi-nude young beauteous womanwreathing around his figure with alike desire and heat of passion thepainting reveals the same thirst or impatience for the life’senjoyment as reveals Khayyam’s quatrain : “open the door ! you knowhow little time we have to stay, and once departed, may return nomore”.Apart this hedonistic visualization of Khayyam’s life-view, those whoincline to descend below the surface in search of a deeper meaning,the ambience as the painting has conceived it : the columns and allthings, the wine-jar, lyre, the lovers’ wears, and even the lovers,all melting into the blue lustre, and all forms, into fluid waves,affords them scope for discovering it. In the painting’s ambience theymight discover the mystique of ‘nothingness’ that characterizes all‘things’. Once the intoxication is on its peak, whether born of wineor of the mystic experience of transcendence, all things appear to bedissolving into the formless expanse, often perceived as the sky – theblue, that appears to be there but is a mere immeasurable delusivevoid that nothing except its nothingness defines and its own aurabrightens.This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr. Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of literature and is the author of numerous books on Indian art and culture. Dr. Daljeet is the curator of the Miniature Painting Gallery, National Museum, New Delhi. They have both collaborated together on a number of books.

Lot 191.Omar Khayyam (Woman, Wine and Song)

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Specifications:
Oil Painting on Canvas
Artist: Anup Gomay
36.00 inch X 48.00 inch

This painting, an imaginative visualization of the life-view of OmarKhayyam, the eleventh century Islamic scholar, poet and mathematicianof Persia, as reveals in his Rubayyat – quatrains, represents a Sheikhwith a glass of wine in his hand while with the other he is holding ayoung beauty passionately leaning upon his bosom. Beside her therelies a jar of wine along with a goblet, and a lyre. A galaxy ofbrilliant stars brightens the night but the lustrous waves of the bluecurling around the lovers are reflections of their own minds whichthis unique combination of wine, woman, music and passion – theessence of living as Omar Khayyam perceived it, breeds.Omar Khayyam, or Omar, the tent-maker, as the term ‘Khayyam’ literallymeans, said, ‘Enjoy wine and women and don’t be afraid, God hascompassion’; and still more, ‘And, if the wine you drink and lips youpress end in Nothing, all things end in nothing, then fancy, whilethou art, thou art (even if you drink and make love), but what, thoushalt be Nothing, thou shalt not be less’, that is, ‘Nothing’ can notreduce into anything less. He said that the dust alike stopped themouths of both, the sages and saints who discuss theology, and thosewho drink wine and press lips. He professed that the life’s tenure isbrief and hence use it more and more in enjoying it : ‘And, as Cockcrew, those who stood before the Tavern shouted “open the door ! youknow how little time we have to stay, and once departed, may return nomore”. Some discovered in Khayyam’s life-view pure hedonism, whileothers, a deep underlying mystique, the divine experience revealedthrough the ‘sensuous’. Hedonist or not, atheist or believer, and hisstatement has mystic dimensions or plain sensualism, the Rubayyat ofOmar Khayyam bred strong imagery effectively reproducible on thecanvas revealing mystique of flesh – the depth of the surface, andhence, the theme of many paintings, especially of post-miniature era.The painting has been rendered pursuing the idiom of modern art asprevailed around 1880-1900 A.D., especially, as practiced by artistsof Bengal who preferred treating realistically the persons, as alsothe themes, born of pure imagination, or those borrowed from othermediums, such as poetry. Even mythical beings or themes that theypainted looked like things of the other day. With its bold imageryrepresented in unambiguous diction, Omar Khayyam’s poetry won greaterfavour of a number of modern painters, especially those from Bengal.This contemporary work seeking to continue the great tradition ofcombining the realistic technique with the imaginative theme, notnecessarily based on this or that particular quatrain, represents OmarKhayyam’s broad life-view. Using the figures of a Sheikh-like lookingpassionate Arab clad in a blue gown and a turban dyed as in the colourof fire, and with a glass of wine in hand, each aspect endowed with ananalogical breadth of meaning, and a semi-nude young beauteous womanwreathing around his figure with alike desire and heat of passion thepainting reveals the same thirst or impatience for the life’senjoyment as reveals Khayyam’s quatrain : “open the door ! you knowhow little time we have to stay, and once departed, may return nomore”.Apart this hedonistic visualization of Khayyam’s life-view, those whoincline to descend below the surface in search of a deeper meaning,the ambience as the painting has conceived it : the columns and allthings, the wine-jar, lyre, the lovers’ wears, and even the lovers,all melting into the blue lustre, and all forms, into fluid waves,affords them scope for discovering it. In the painting’s ambience theymight discover the mystique of ‘nothingness’ that characterizes all‘things’. Once the intoxication is on its peak, whether born of wineor of the mystic experience of transcendence, all things appear to bedissolving into the formless expanse, often perceived as the sky – theblue, that appears to be there but is a mere immeasurable delusivevoid that nothing except its nothingness defines and its own aurabrightens.This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr. Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of literature and is the author of numerous books on Indian art and culture. Dr. Daljeet is the curator of the Miniature Painting Gallery, National Museum, New Delhi. They have both collaborated together on a number of books.