Description
Shah Jahan
The ancient nostalgia strikes right back with this watercolor masterpiece as Kailash Raj encapsulates the Mughal Emperor and Premier, Shah Jehan with his lovely brush strokes. He is depicted as a medium brown olive undertoned prince whose countenance is adorned with thin black rounded eyebrows complimented by his lovely almond shaped eyes that are hooded with thick lashes. A firm Greek nose is illustrated in his face with a short philtrum that show out his full lips. His facial hair is neatly trimmed to exhibit a sophisticated ducktail beard and thick sideburns that etch the canvas.The royal is appareled in a chiffon white jama that is emblazoned with aqua white drop shaped stones, fastened around his body with a vibrant motif waistband tinted in an amber and watermelon orange tint, coupled with his bright yellow churidar pajamas which are embellished with yellow and green checkered lines. His feet are gracefully decorated with an olive painted khussa with golden imprints along with a fire yellow stripe of vibrant floral pattern envelops it.The prince's ears are ornamented with pearl hoops and a tri-layered white pearl opera with lovely gemstones drapes over his chest. A thin brown belt goes diagonally from his left shoulder down his waist. An old fashioned dagger with a gold plated handle is sheathed in a leather covering embossed with intricate black-gold designs. The geezer's wrists are graced with sparkling silver bracelets and expensive stone embedded rings. His unkempt hair is cleverly covered in a cotton turban that is illustrated in vivacious colors and beady strands that droop over every pleat, luring the spectators. A strong blackish silver shield peaks across his thighs as the Highness takes on a grim expression with his eyes fixed in an infinite direction while a gloomy backdrop lingers over the spectators quite mysteriously making it your first and best shopping item.



Specifications:

Miniature Painting On Paper Artist: Kailash Raj

5.8 inch x 8.8 inch



Mughal Painting

The Mughal school of painting runs parallel to the Mughal dynasty. It came into prominence in the sixteenth century, during the reign of king Akbar. It reached its zenith under the patronage of Akbar’s grandson – king Jahangir. The reign of the latter’s successor king Shah Jahan saw its decline and finally under the unsympathetic Aurangzeb it breathed its last. Indeed, as a school of art, the duration of Mughal painting was a limited one, extending only over approximately two and a half centuries. Actually, it has often been referred to as not exactly a school, but rather an exceptionally brilliant phase in Indian art.

The roots of Mughal painting lay in Samarkand and Herat, where under the patronage of the Timurid kings, Persian art reached its apogee. Babur, a descendant of Timur, and the founder of the Mughal dynasty, speaks of a person named ‘Bihzad’ as ‘a most eminent painter’. It was with the descendants of Bihzad and the deep personal interest taken by Akbar, the grandson of king Babur, that the Mughal school of art started off with a flourish.

Regarding the aesthetics of Mughal painting, one exceptional feature is its commitment to realism or the delineation of likeness. The subjects were majorly drawn from the extremely rich and magnificent court life under the Mughals. That this was a flourishing art during Akbar’s reign is borne out by the list of more than forty painters found in a book written during his era.

However, it was under Akbar’s son Jehangir that Mughal painting gained its highest peaks. Not only portraits and hunting scenes, but also scientific studies of botany and natural history found favor with the artists under the king’s support. The Mughal painters were asked to paint unusual specimens of flora and fauna in their exact likeness. Some of these skilfully painted pictures have survived till today, narrating to us the uniqueness of those rich times.

Under the reign of Shajahan, son of Jahangir, the Mughal school of painting entered its decline. The actual treatment of the subject matter is replaced with more decorative embellishments like rich flowery borders etc. Under Shahjahan architecture scaled new peaks (Taj Mahal etc.), but painting deteriorated. Finally, with the rise of Aurangzeb, Mughal painting breathed its last.

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