Description
Kailash Raj works his magic again as he pictures a vibrant and prominent drawing that is marvelously filled with watercolors worth leaving a deep mark on your soul. The illustrated princess is appareled in a baggy silk gharara pant that is colored in thick vertical stripes of bright sandstone orange and moss green color with a printed banarsi design on its lower end, coupled with the same colored yet horizontal striped design that emblazons her tight top as a light royal yellow silk dupatta imprinted with lovely thin black lines and bordered with eye-catching motifs, drapes down her shoulder.Her pale delicate hands are adorned with a gold plated and a pearl hand panja with stone embedded rings that enhance her fingers, along with the fantastically designed and intricately webbed gold kangans that chime with each touch. Her ears are concealed with majestic floral and leafy gota drop earrings that drape downwards. The lady's hair is commended with a sparkling forehead white and green pearl headpassa and maang tikka. Her beautiful neck is enhanced with a Kundan pearl choker necklace that is tinted with vibrant gems as a lovely white beaded opera drapes down her chest. The lass's smooth feet sway in the fantabulous sounds of the moonstone anklets that grip across her skin as she rests it on a well upholstered tuffet.With the wonderful jewels and a breathtaking outfit, the lady herself is a beauty worth watching. Her warm ivory plump face is divinely carved with a perfect Greek nose, complimented by her mesmerizing upturned eyes and thin soft angled eyebrows. Her full lips emblazon her face, twitching in a smile, revealing a deep philtrum as she blushes pink. The framework behind her is quite aesthetic, illustrating a tri-gravuty defying lamp that illuminates up, showing the strength of her love, even portraying a caged shamrock green parrot that depicts the secrecy of her feelings for her lover. Her apathetic attitude to her spotted cat exhibits that she is deeply bewitched in the intensity of her love and is unable to think about anything. The lovely backdrop paints to show a golden water vessel and a remarkably carved glass as the lady sits on a comfy red sofa that has braided golden borders, with the river full of sucks and a hilly green land that peaks from the large window, making this scenic beauty a worth buying painting.

Specifications:
Watercolor on Paper
Artist: Kailash Raj
7.5 inches X 11.5 inches

Mughal Painting
The Mughal school of painting runs parallel to the Mughal dynasty. It came into prominence in the sixteenth century, during the reign of king Akbar. It reached its zenith under the patronage of Akbar’s grandson – king Jahangir. The reign of the latter’s successor king Shah Jahan saw its decline and finally under the unsympathetic Aurangzeb it breathed its last. Indeed, as a school of art, the duration of Mughal painting was a limited one, extending only over approximately two and a half centuries. Actually, it has often been referred to as not exactly a school, but rather an exceptionally brilliant phase in Indian art.
The roots of Mughal painting lay in Samarkand and Herat, where under the patronage of the Timurid kings, Persian art reached its apogee. Babur, a descendant of Timur, and the founder of the Mughal dynasty, speaks of a person named ‘Bihzad’ as ‘a most eminent painter’. It was with the descendants of Bihzad and the deep personal interest taken by Akbar, the grandson of king Babur, that the Mughal school of art started off with a flourish.
Regarding the aesthetics of Mughal painting, one exceptional feature is its commitment to realism or the delineation of likeness. The subjects were majorly drawn from the extremely rich and magnificent court life under the Mughals. That this was a flourishing art during Akbar’s reign is borne out by the list of more than forty painters found in a book written during his era.
However, it was under Akbar’s son Jehangir that Mughal painting gained its highest peaks. Not only portraits and hunting scenes, but also scientific studies of botany and natural history found favor with the artists under the king’s support. The Mughal painters were asked to paint unusual specimens of flora and fauna in their exact likeness. Some of these skilfully painted pictures have survived till today, narrating to us the uniqueness of those rich times.
Under the reign of Shajahan, son of Jahangir, the Mughal school of painting entered its decline. The actual treatment of the subject matter is replaced with more decorative embellishments like rich flowery borders etc. Under Shahjahan architecture scaled new peaks (Taj Mahal etc.), but painting deteriorated. Finally, with the rise of Aurangzeb, Mughal painting breathed its last.

Lot 41.The Princess

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Online

Kailash Raj works his magic again as he pictures a vibrant and prominent drawing that is marvelously filled with watercolors worth leaving a deep mark on your soul. The illustrated princess is appareled in a baggy silk gharara pant that is colored in thick vertical stripes of bright sandstone orange and moss green color with a printed banarsi design on its lower end, coupled with the same colored yet horizontal striped design that emblazons her tight top as a light royal yellow silk dupatta imprinted with lovely thin black lines and bordered with eye-catching motifs, drapes down her shoulder.Her pale delicate hands are adorned with a gold plated and a pearl hand panja with stone embedded rings that enhance her fingers, along with the fantastically designed and intricately webbed gold kangans that chime with each touch. Her ears are concealed with majestic floral and leafy gota drop earrings that drape downwards. The lady's hair is commended with a sparkling forehead white and green pearl headpassa and maang tikka. Her beautiful neck is enhanced with a Kundan pearl choker necklace that is tinted with vibrant gems as a lovely white beaded opera drapes down her chest. The lass's smooth feet sway in the fantabulous sounds of the moonstone anklets that grip across her skin as she rests it on a well upholstered tuffet.With the wonderful jewels and a breathtaking outfit, the lady herself is a beauty worth watching. Her warm ivory plump face is divinely carved with a perfect Greek nose, complimented by her mesmerizing upturned eyes and thin soft angled eyebrows. Her full lips emblazon her face, twitching in a smile, revealing a deep philtrum as she blushes pink. The framework behind her is quite aesthetic, illustrating a tri-gravuty defying lamp that illuminates up, showing the strength of her love, even portraying a caged shamrock green parrot that depicts the secrecy of her feelings for her lover. Her apathetic attitude to her spotted cat exhibits that she is deeply bewitched in the intensity of her love and is unable to think about anything. The lovely backdrop paints to show a golden water vessel and a remarkably carved glass as the lady sits on a comfy red sofa that has braided golden borders, with the river full of sucks and a hilly green land that peaks from the large window, making this scenic beauty a worth buying painting.

Specifications:
Watercolor on Paper
Artist: Kailash Raj
7.5 inches X 11.5 inches

Mughal Painting
The Mughal school of painting runs parallel to the Mughal dynasty. It came into prominence in the sixteenth century, during the reign of king Akbar. It reached its zenith under the patronage of Akbar’s grandson – king Jahangir. The reign of the latter’s successor king Shah Jahan saw its decline and finally under the unsympathetic Aurangzeb it breathed its last. Indeed, as a school of art, the duration of Mughal painting was a limited one, extending only over approximately two and a half centuries. Actually, it has often been referred to as not exactly a school, but rather an exceptionally brilliant phase in Indian art.
The roots of Mughal painting lay in Samarkand and Herat, where under the patronage of the Timurid kings, Persian art reached its apogee. Babur, a descendant of Timur, and the founder of the Mughal dynasty, speaks of a person named ‘Bihzad’ as ‘a most eminent painter’. It was with the descendants of Bihzad and the deep personal interest taken by Akbar, the grandson of king Babur, that the Mughal school of art started off with a flourish.
Regarding the aesthetics of Mughal painting, one exceptional feature is its commitment to realism or the delineation of likeness. The subjects were majorly drawn from the extremely rich and magnificent court life under the Mughals. That this was a flourishing art during Akbar’s reign is borne out by the list of more than forty painters found in a book written during his era.
However, it was under Akbar’s son Jehangir that Mughal painting gained its highest peaks. Not only portraits and hunting scenes, but also scientific studies of botany and natural history found favor with the artists under the king’s support. The Mughal painters were asked to paint unusual specimens of flora and fauna in their exact likeness. Some of these skilfully painted pictures have survived till today, narrating to us the uniqueness of those rich times.
Under the reign of Shajahan, son of Jahangir, the Mughal school of painting entered its decline. The actual treatment of the subject matter is replaced with more decorative embellishments like rich flowery borders etc. Under Shahjahan architecture scaled new peaks (Taj Mahal etc.), but painting deteriorated. Finally, with the rise of Aurangzeb, Mughal painting breathed its last.