Description
Water colour paintings on marble are a rare work of art. Each of the ones in our collection has been handpicked for the precision and finish, not to mention the classic appeal of the subject portrayed therein. The one you see on this page is the bust of a Mughal princess. That she is Mughal could be made out from the style of her shringar and the hint of palace architecture in the background. Also, transparent dupattas were a thing in the visual arts popular with the Mughals._x000D_The fair shahzadi (Urdu for ‘princess’) holds a tiny red flower to her charming face. She stares out at a distance, probably at her ladies-in-waiting, too shy to face the painter. Her delicate-featured beauty is of a gentle, comforting variety, nothing too intimidating. The feminine colours of her ensemble - pink and orange - go well with her complexion, and so does the shringar of statement gold and rubies that she has chosen for the occasion._x000D_On the palace walls behind her is an open window. Beyond the same is a bed of pale flowers, followed by rolling greenery as far as the eyes could see. Such was the glamour of the Mughal court-gardens, the likes of which are rare to come by any longer. The ringlet of light floral tendrils that frame the composition complement the stance of the black-hair princess.

Specifications:
Water Color Painting On marble Saucer_x000D_
Varnished
12 Inches Diameter

These unique artworks come along with a suitable gift box, and also a wooden stand - as shown in the accompanying image on the left.

Mughal Painting
The Mughal school of painting runs parallel to the Mughal dynasty. It came into prominence in the sixteenth century, during the reign of king Akbar. It reached its zenith under the patronage of Akbar’s grandson – king Jahangir. The reign of the latter’s successor king Shah Jahan saw its decline and finally under the unsympathetic Aurangzeb it breathed its last. Indeed, as a school of art, the duration of Mughal painting was a limited one, extending only over approximately two and a half centuries. Actually, it has often been referred to as not exactly a school, but rather an exceptionally brilliant phase in Indian art.
The roots of Mughal painting lay in Samarkand and Herat, where under the patronage of the Timurid kings, Persian art reached its apogee. Babur, a descendant of Timur, and the founder of the Mughal dynasty, speaks of a person named ‘Bihzad’ as ‘a most eminent painter’. It was with the descendants of Bihzad and the deep personal interest taken by Akbar, the grandson of king Babur, that the Mughal school of art started off with a flourish.
Regarding the aesthetics of Mughal painting, one exceptional feature is its commitment to realism or the delineation of likeness. The subjects were majorly drawn from the extremely rich and magnificent court life under the Mughals. That this was a flourishing art during Akbar’s reign is borne out by the list of more than forty painters found in a book written during his era.
However, it was under Akbar’s son Jehangir that Mughal painting gained its highest peaks. Not only portraits and hunting scenes, but also scientific studies of botany and natural history found favor with the artists under the king’s support. The Mughal painters were asked to paint unusual specimens of flora and fauna in their exact likeness. Some of these skilfully painted pictures have survived till today, narrating to us the uniqueness of those rich times.
Under the reign of Shajahan, son of Jahangir, the Mughal school of painting entered its decline. The actual treatment of the subject matter is replaced with more decorative embellishments like rich flowery borders etc. Under Shahjahan architecture scaled new peaks (Taj Mahal etc.), but painting deteriorated. Finally, with the rise of Aurangzeb, Mughal painting breathed its last.

Lot 63.The Fair Shahzadi

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Water colour paintings on marble are a rare work of art. Each of the ones in our collection has been handpicked for the precision and finish, not to mention the classic appeal of the subject portrayed therein. The one you see on this page is the bust of a Mughal princess. That she is Mughal could be made out from the style of her shringar and the hint of palace architecture in the background. Also, transparent dupattas were a thing in the visual arts popular with the Mughals._x000D_The fair shahzadi (Urdu for ‘princess’) holds a tiny red flower to her charming face. She stares out at a distance, probably at her ladies-in-waiting, too shy to face the painter. Her delicate-featured beauty is of a gentle, comforting variety, nothing too intimidating. The feminine colours of her ensemble - pink and orange - go well with her complexion, and so does the shringar of statement gold and rubies that she has chosen for the occasion._x000D_On the palace walls behind her is an open window. Beyond the same is a bed of pale flowers, followed by rolling greenery as far as the eyes could see. Such was the glamour of the Mughal court-gardens, the likes of which are rare to come by any longer. The ringlet of light floral tendrils that frame the composition complement the stance of the black-hair princess.

Specifications:
Water Color Painting On marble Saucer_x000D_
Varnished
12 Inches Diameter

These unique artworks come along with a suitable gift box, and also a wooden stand - as shown in the accompanying image on the left.

Mughal Painting
The Mughal school of painting runs parallel to the Mughal dynasty. It came into prominence in the sixteenth century, during the reign of king Akbar. It reached its zenith under the patronage of Akbar’s grandson – king Jahangir. The reign of the latter’s successor king Shah Jahan saw its decline and finally under the unsympathetic Aurangzeb it breathed its last. Indeed, as a school of art, the duration of Mughal painting was a limited one, extending only over approximately two and a half centuries. Actually, it has often been referred to as not exactly a school, but rather an exceptionally brilliant phase in Indian art.
The roots of Mughal painting lay in Samarkand and Herat, where under the patronage of the Timurid kings, Persian art reached its apogee. Babur, a descendant of Timur, and the founder of the Mughal dynasty, speaks of a person named ‘Bihzad’ as ‘a most eminent painter’. It was with the descendants of Bihzad and the deep personal interest taken by Akbar, the grandson of king Babur, that the Mughal school of art started off with a flourish.
Regarding the aesthetics of Mughal painting, one exceptional feature is its commitment to realism or the delineation of likeness. The subjects were majorly drawn from the extremely rich and magnificent court life under the Mughals. That this was a flourishing art during Akbar’s reign is borne out by the list of more than forty painters found in a book written during his era.
However, it was under Akbar’s son Jehangir that Mughal painting gained its highest peaks. Not only portraits and hunting scenes, but also scientific studies of botany and natural history found favor with the artists under the king’s support. The Mughal painters were asked to paint unusual specimens of flora and fauna in their exact likeness. Some of these skilfully painted pictures have survived till today, narrating to us the uniqueness of those rich times.
Under the reign of Shajahan, son of Jahangir, the Mughal school of painting entered its decline. The actual treatment of the subject matter is replaced with more decorative embellishments like rich flowery borders etc. Under Shahjahan architecture scaled new peaks (Taj Mahal etc.), but painting deteriorated. Finally, with the rise of Aurangzeb, Mughal painting breathed its last.