Description
Kailash Raj has worked his magic again with this valuable piece of art. In this painting, he portrays a middle-aged man with a horseshoe hairline that reveals his vast bald spot, enclosed by his tawny brown hair. His countenance is etched with monolid eyes and thick straight eyebrows which compliment his long snubby nose and down turned lips. A lengthy French fork beard is drawn over the plump face of the missionary as he wears an Egyptian blue and buttoned toga like gown that is fastened at his waist by a snakeskin textured silver belt. The geezer is adorned with a candy apple colored cape that hangs over his dress with a lapel pin brooch that connects over to his tiny prince Nez spectacles which he holds in his hand. His neck is enhanced with a pleated white inner that contrasts his gingerbread high length boots and tanned hands.The entire painting is bordered in a lovely syrup brown rectangular frame that is imprinted with gorgeous golden motifs, highlighted with the Maya blue hued sky, filled with soaring birds. A lush green acacia tree hangs down over its shamrock painted trunk, contoured by a less voluminous teal tinged tree that illuminates like an aureole, circling around the missionary's head. Grey river water seeps over the bright green grass as the growing weeds protect the two golden tinted books, one of them splits open as the wind blow while his charcoal black cloche hat rests on the grassy ground. The artist elegantly captures lovely silhouettes in the background who are accompanied by an equally excellent illustration of crème white buildings that extend to give out a look of wide domes.This painting shows the selflessness in the life of a missionary who gives up all his worldly desires in order to earn closeness to God and to help others follow this path too. It is the perfect wall hanging, being the best reminder of our sole and primitive purpose on the face of the Earth.

Specifications:
Water Color Painting on Paper
Artist: Kailash Raj
6.0 inch X 9.5 inch

Mughal Painting
The Mughal school of painting runs parallel to the Mughal dynasty. It came into prominence in the sixteenth century, during the reign of king Akbar. It reached its zenith under the patronage of Akbar’s grandson – king Jahangir. The reign of the latter’s successor king Shah Jahan saw its decline and finally under the unsympathetic Aurangzeb it breathed its last. Indeed, as a school of art, the duration of Mughal painting was a limited one, extending only over approximately two and a half centuries. Actually, it has often been referred to as not exactly a school, but rather an exceptionally brilliant phase in Indian art.
The roots of Mughal painting lay in Samarkand and Herat, where under the patronage of the Timurid kings, Persian art reached its apogee. Babur, a descendant of Timur, and the founder of the Mughal dynasty, speaks of a person named ‘Bihzad’ as ‘a most eminent painter’. It was with the descendants of Bihzad and the deep personal interest taken by Akbar, the grandson of king Babur, that the Mughal school of art started off with a flourish.
Regarding the aesthetics of Mughal painting, one exceptional feature is its commitment to realism or the delineation of likeness. The subjects were majorly drawn from the extremely rich and magnificent court life under the Mughals. That this was a flourishing art during Akbar’s reign is borne out by the list of more than forty painters found in a book written during his era.
However, it was under Akbar’s son Jehangir that Mughal painting gained its highest peaks. Not only portraits and hunting scenes, but also scientific studies of botany and natural history found favor with the artists under the king’s support. The Mughal painters were asked to paint unusual specimens of flora and fauna in their exact likeness. Some of these skilfully painted pictures have survived till today, narrating to us the uniqueness of those rich times.
Under the reign of Shajahan, son of Jahangir, the Mughal school of painting entered its decline. The actual treatment of the subject matter is replaced with more decorative embellishments like rich flowery borders etc. Under Shahjahan architecture scaled new peaks (Taj Mahal etc.), but painting deteriorated. Finally, with the rise of Aurangzeb, Mughal painting breathed its last.

Lot 70.Portrait of A Missionary

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Kailash Raj has worked his magic again with this valuable piece of art. In this painting, he portrays a middle-aged man with a horseshoe hairline that reveals his vast bald spot, enclosed by his tawny brown hair. His countenance is etched with monolid eyes and thick straight eyebrows which compliment his long snubby nose and down turned lips. A lengthy French fork beard is drawn over the plump face of the missionary as he wears an Egyptian blue and buttoned toga like gown that is fastened at his waist by a snakeskin textured silver belt. The geezer is adorned with a candy apple colored cape that hangs over his dress with a lapel pin brooch that connects over to his tiny prince Nez spectacles which he holds in his hand. His neck is enhanced with a pleated white inner that contrasts his gingerbread high length boots and tanned hands.The entire painting is bordered in a lovely syrup brown rectangular frame that is imprinted with gorgeous golden motifs, highlighted with the Maya blue hued sky, filled with soaring birds. A lush green acacia tree hangs down over its shamrock painted trunk, contoured by a less voluminous teal tinged tree that illuminates like an aureole, circling around the missionary's head. Grey river water seeps over the bright green grass as the growing weeds protect the two golden tinted books, one of them splits open as the wind blow while his charcoal black cloche hat rests on the grassy ground. The artist elegantly captures lovely silhouettes in the background who are accompanied by an equally excellent illustration of crème white buildings that extend to give out a look of wide domes.This painting shows the selflessness in the life of a missionary who gives up all his worldly desires in order to earn closeness to God and to help others follow this path too. It is the perfect wall hanging, being the best reminder of our sole and primitive purpose on the face of the Earth.

Specifications:
Water Color Painting on Paper
Artist: Kailash Raj
6.0 inch X 9.5 inch

Mughal Painting
The Mughal school of painting runs parallel to the Mughal dynasty. It came into prominence in the sixteenth century, during the reign of king Akbar. It reached its zenith under the patronage of Akbar’s grandson – king Jahangir. The reign of the latter’s successor king Shah Jahan saw its decline and finally under the unsympathetic Aurangzeb it breathed its last. Indeed, as a school of art, the duration of Mughal painting was a limited one, extending only over approximately two and a half centuries. Actually, it has often been referred to as not exactly a school, but rather an exceptionally brilliant phase in Indian art.
The roots of Mughal painting lay in Samarkand and Herat, where under the patronage of the Timurid kings, Persian art reached its apogee. Babur, a descendant of Timur, and the founder of the Mughal dynasty, speaks of a person named ‘Bihzad’ as ‘a most eminent painter’. It was with the descendants of Bihzad and the deep personal interest taken by Akbar, the grandson of king Babur, that the Mughal school of art started off with a flourish.
Regarding the aesthetics of Mughal painting, one exceptional feature is its commitment to realism or the delineation of likeness. The subjects were majorly drawn from the extremely rich and magnificent court life under the Mughals. That this was a flourishing art during Akbar’s reign is borne out by the list of more than forty painters found in a book written during his era.
However, it was under Akbar’s son Jehangir that Mughal painting gained its highest peaks. Not only portraits and hunting scenes, but also scientific studies of botany and natural history found favor with the artists under the king’s support. The Mughal painters were asked to paint unusual specimens of flora and fauna in their exact likeness. Some of these skilfully painted pictures have survived till today, narrating to us the uniqueness of those rich times.
Under the reign of Shajahan, son of Jahangir, the Mughal school of painting entered its decline. The actual treatment of the subject matter is replaced with more decorative embellishments like rich flowery borders etc. Under Shahjahan architecture scaled new peaks (Taj Mahal etc.), but painting deteriorated. Finally, with the rise of Aurangzeb, Mughal painting breathed its last.