Lot 61

Louis XVI Lacquer Secretary en armoire
143.5 x 92 x 41.5 cm.
Hallmarked: Pierre-Harry Mewesen, master craftsman from 26 March 1766.
Paris, c. 1780.

Body veneered with precious woods and covered with black lacquer panels. The horizontally double-jointed corpus is mounted on sloped feet, over which indented pilaster strips mediate between the cheeks and the front. Lower compartment with two doors and underpinned by strict ormolu lambrequin. The doors are decorated with an overlapping ormolu-edged and black-ground lacquer panel, this with chinoiserie gold lacquer painting showing trees in an abstract landscape. Upper compartment with hinged writing tablet; this is decorated in the same form as the lower doors, but with denser and more detailed decoration, including architectural staffage. Cornice with à jour worked ox-eye relief and integrated drawer, the corner pilasters with plastic triglyph decoration. Overlapping, light, veined marble top plate. Lower compartment with two open compartments and two drawers with bronze pull knobs. Upper compartment with five drawers covered with black lacquer with gold lacquer decoration and five compartments arranged in an offset pattern. Gold-tooled leather writing tablet.

Note:
Originally from Scandinavia, Pierre-Harry Mewesen worked at Faubourg-Saint-Antoine until the outbreak of the French Revolution. He created some Louis XV furniture and numerous Transition and Louis XVI furniture with fine marquetry. He often made secretaries, encoignures and chests of drawers, always of high quality and discreetly decorated with bronzes.

Literature on the artist:
Pierre Kjellberg, Le mobilier français du XVIIIe siècle, Paris 1989, p. 566f.
Jean Nicolay, L'art et la manière des maîtres ébénistes français au XVIIIe siècle, Paris 1976, I, p. 314. (1241717) (13)


Louis XVI en armoire laquer secretary

143.5 x 92 x 41.5 cm.
Hallmarked: Pierre-Harry Mewesen, master since 26 March 1766.
Paris, ca. 1780.

Top compartment with folding writing desk decorated in the same manner as the lower doors but with denser and more detailed depiction of architectural staffage. Moulding with "à jour" ox eye relief and built-in drawer, the corner pilaster strips with three-dimensional triglyph décor. Overlapping, light veined marble top.

Notes:
Mewesen, who was originally from Scandinavia, worked at Faubourg-Saint-Antoine until the start of the French Revolution. He created some pieces of Louis XV furniture and numerous transition style and Louis XVI pieces with fine marquetry. He often created bureaus, corner cupboards and commodes, always of high quality and subtly decorated with bronze fittings.

Literature regarding the artist:
P. Kjellberg, Le mobilier français du XVIIIe siècle, Paris 1989; pp. 566.
J. Nicolay, L'art et la manière des maîtres ébénistes français au XVIIIe siècle, Paris 1976, I, p. 314.