Lot 571

Salvador Dalí,
1904 Figueres - 1989 ibid.
MÉTAMORPHOSE TOPOLOGIQUE DE LA VÉNUS DE MILO, 1988

Bronze, greenish patina.
Total height: approx. 205 cm.
Signed "Salvador Dalí" on the base, "CIRE PERDUE C." on the reverse. VALSUANI 6/8 (8 copies + IV E.A).

The Venus of Milo, found in the Louvre in Paris in 1820 on the Greek island of Milos, is one of the most famous examples of Hellenistic art and gave Salvador Dalí the opportunity to deal with it during his artistic career. Dalí contrasted the delicate female body with its supple curves in a surreal way with the angular, static forms of drawers that spring from the body and penetrate it. According to Robert Descharnes, the bronze was preceded by a clay copy of Dalí's Venus of Milo and Descharnes quotes "My first project as a sculptor gave me unknown and delicious erotic joy". In this sculpture Dalí also plays with the idea of the opening of the woman in the sense of a discovery of the inner secrets, which are symoblized by the opened drawers. On a cubic base with reliefs after Dalí.

Provenance:
Artcurial, 01 December 2015, lot 29.
Paris private property.

Literature:
Cf.: A similar, comparable copy in: Robert et Nicolás Descharnes, Dali The Hard and the Soft Spells for the Magic of Form Sculptures & Objects, Eccart, Paris, No. 7, with colour illustration p. 38. (1240191) (13)


Salvador Dalí,
1904 Figueres - 1989 ibid.

MÉTAMORPHOSE TOPOLOGIQUE DE LA VÉNUS DE MILO, 1988

Bronze, with green patina.
Total height: 205 cm.
Signed on base: "Salvador Dalí", on the reverse: "CIRE PERDUE [lost-wax casting] C. VALSUANI limited ed. 6/8 (8 examples + IV artist's proofs)"

The Venus de Milo, held at the Louvre in Paris and discovered in 1820 on the Greek island of Milos, is one of the most renowned examples of Hellenistic art and it gave Salvador Dalí an opportunity for artistic dialogue throughout his career. Dalí contrasted the delicate female body with its supple curves with the angular, static shapes of drawers, which are emerging from her body as well as penetrating it in a surreal style. According to Robert Descharnes, a terracotta copy by Dalí preceded the bronze Venus de Milo and he cites that: "My first project as a sculptor gave me unknown and delicious erotic joy". In this sculpture Dalí also alludes to the "opening" of a woman in the sense of discovering her inner secrets, which are symbolized by the pulled out drawers. On cubic base with reliefs after Dalí.

Provenance:
Artcurial, 1 December 2015, lot 29.
private collection, Paris.

Literature:
Compare: A similar, comparable example can be found in: R. et N. Descharnes, Dali The Hard and the Soft Spells for the Magic of Form Sculptures & Objects, Eccart, Paris, no. 7 with colour ill. p. 38.