Lot 2

ANDREAS RITZOS 1421 Iraklio/Crete - 1492 (circle of) AN IMPORTANT AND MONUMENTAL ICON SHOWING THE MOTHER OF GOD 'KARDIOTISSA' Greek, Cretan, late 15th century Tempera on wood panel. The Mother of God depicted half-length, with elongated, noble features, tenderly holding the Child with both her hands. Christ touching his cheek to the face of his Mother, holding the hem of her maphorion in a playful manner. The punched haloes decorated with scrolls, against a brilliant gold. Prtially restored. 73.5 x 59 cm. Andreas Ritzos was born in Iraklio on the island of Crete as the son of a goldsmith. He is considered the greatest Cretan painter of the second half of the 15th century. His works, like those of the painter Angelos, were models for the following generations of icon-painters. Ritzos orientated himself on the Byzantine style, but in some works he also let the Italian painting style of the 14th century flow in. He is mentioned in documents until 1492. The Cardiotissa type was created in the middle of the 15th century. The best known example is signed by the famous Cretan icon painter Angelos and is now in the Byzantine Museum in Athens. However, the somewhat softer execution of the facial features make this icon more likely to be attributed to the work of Andreas Ritzos and his circle.
ANDREAS RITZOS 1421 Iraklio - 1492 ibid (perimeter) SIGNIFICANT MONUMENTAL ICON WITH THE GOD'S MOTHER 'CARDIOTISSA' Greece, Crete, late 15th century egg tempera on chalk ground on wood, gold ground, nimben ornamentally punctuated. 73,5 x 59 cm. Half-figure reproduction of the Mother of God. In her arms she is holding the Christ Child, who is touching the head and neck of the Mother of God with both outstretched arms. The sole of his left foot has already detached itself from the sole of his foot and releases the sole. Two angels appear in the upper two corners. Partially min. rest. Ritzos was born in Iraklio on the island of Crete as the son of a goldsmith. He is considered the greatest Cretan painter of the second half of the 15th century. His works, like those of the painter Angelos, were models for the following generations of icon painters. Ritzos oriented himself on the Byzantine style, but in some works he also let the Italian painting style of the 14th century flow in. He is mentioned in documents until 1492. The type of the Cardiotissa was created in the middle of the 15th century. The best known example bears the signature of the famous Cretan icon painter Angelos and is now in the Byzantine Museum in Athens. However, the somewhat softer execution of the facial features make this icon more likely to be attributed to the work of Andreas Ritzos and his circle.