Lot 3

ANDREAS RITZOS 1921 Candia/Crete - 1492 (Circle of) A VERY IMPORTANT AND MONUMENTAL ICON SHOWING THE MOTHER OF GOD OF THE PASSION FROM A CHURCH ICONOSTASIS Greek, Cretan, late 15th century Tempera on wood panel. The Mother of God portrayed half-length, looking at the beholder, supporting Christ on her left forearm, the latter leaning forward, turning his head towards the angel behind him and grasping his Mother's right hand. The two angels carrying the instruments of Christ's Passion. The garments of the Mother of God coloured in complimentary deep red and blue, the stars on her forehead and the edges of her maphorion rendered in gold, Christ's white chiton decorated with lilies, his orange himation highlighted with dense chrysography. Against a gold background. The long inscription at right means: He who previously declared "hail!" to the All-Pure One now shows the symbols of the Passion, and Christ, clothed in mortal flesh, timorously fears on seeing them. Wearings, minor losses to the borders, minimally restored. Traces of a signature at the base of the icon. 85 x 64 cm. This iconography of the Mother of God was developed in Crete during the 15th century. One of the most famous, early examples of the subject is the icon painted by the celebrated Cretan iconographer, Andreas Ritzos, today at the Recklinghausen Museum. This icon bears stylistic similarities to Ritzos's icon as seen in the colours, the geometrical rendition of the folds and the fine, white highlights on the flesh. For similar icons see: I. Bentchev - E. Haustein-Bartsch: Icons of Our Lady, Recklinghausen 2000, Cat. 85, M. Vassilaki: The Hand of Angelos, Athens 2010, Fig 28.
ANDREAS RITZOS 1421 Candia/Crete - 1492 (periphery) MUSEUM AND MONUMENTAL ICONS WITH THE MOTHER OF GOD OF THE PASSION FROM A CHURCHICAL ICONOSTASE Crete, end of 15th century Composite of three boards with two nailed-on back-sponki (lost). Egg tempera on chalk ground over canvas, gilding. 85 x 64 cm. Remains of a signature at lower margin. The four-line inscription (tetrachstichon) to the right of the Christ Boy is the typical explanation which can be found both in Greek and Latin in the representation - depending on the patron: Before he [Archangel Gabriel] gave the greeting to the very pure, he shows the instruments of suffering, but Christ, made mortal flesh, fearfully sees them in mortal fear. This inscription can also be found on an icon with Our Lady of the Passion, which is today in the Icon Museum in Recklinghausen and is attributed to Andreas Ritzos. A three-part icon in Bari with St. Nicholas of Myra, the Mother of God of the Passion, and St. John the Theologian in Silence, which is also attributed to Andreas Ritzos, suggests, due to the close stylistic proximity, that this icon was attributed to the artist or at least to his immediate circle. rubbed off, minor loss of substance in the margin area, slightly rest. literature: I. Bentchev - E. Haustein-Bartsch: Icons of Our Lady, Recklinghausen 2000, cat. 85. M. Vassilaki: The Hand of Angelos, Athens 2010, Fig 28.