Description
Kingdom of Prussia - Order for Merit for Science and Art "Pour le Mérite für Wissenschaften und Künste": knight's jewel in chased gold, openwork, the legend on a blue enamelled background, encircled by four small bifacial royal crowns, the reverse smooth and plain, signed "Hossauer Berlin", double ring, period black silk tie bordered with silver threads (slightly discoloured and oxidized).
55 x 51,5 mm, gross weight : 14,55 g
Prussia, circa 1840.
Created in 1740 by King Frederick II of Prussia from the Brandenburg order "of Generosity", the order "For Merit" was the most prestigious decoration of the kingdom of Prussia. Until 1810 it rewarded both civil and military merits - one of its most tumultuous holders was Voltaire in 1750 -, it was then reserved for officers for acts of bravery against the enemy. As civilians were deprived of its prestige, on 31 May 1842, Frederick William IV established a civilian class to reward eminent merit in the scientific and artistic fields. The first holder and chancellor of this civil class was Alexander von Humbolt (1769-1859). This class was reserved for thirty Germans and thirty foreigners, renewed by co-option in chapter. Abolished in 1918, reconstituted in 1924, forbidden in 1933, it was restored in 1952.
Jean-Baptiste Biot was decorated on August 16, 1850, thus joining some illustrious Frenchmen among whom Arago, Ingres, Daguerre, Fontaine, Gay-Lussac, Vernet and Guizot (Chateaubriand died in 1848, was part of the first promotion).
TTB to SUP
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Kingdom of Prussia - Order for Merit for Science and Art "Pour le Mérite für Wissenschaften und Künste": knight's jewel in chased gold, openwork, the legend on a blue enamelled background, encircled by four small bifacial royal crowns, the reverse smooth and plain, signed "Hossauer Berlin", double ring, period black silk tie bordered with silver threads (slightly discoloured and oxidized). 55 x 51,5 mm, gross weight : 14,55 gPrussia, circa 1840.Created in 1740 by King Frederick II of Prussia from the Brandenburg order "of Generosity", the order "For Merit" was the most prestigious decoration of the kingdom of Prussia. Until 1810 it rewarded both civil and military merits - one of its most tumultuous holders was Voltaire in 1750 -, it was then reserved for officers for acts of bravery against the enemy. As civilians were deprived of its prestige, on 31 May 1842, Frederick William IV established a civilian class to reward eminent merit in the scientific and artistic fields. The first holder and chancellor of this civil class was Alexander von Humbolt (1769-1859). This class was reserved for thirty Germans and thirty foreigners, renewed by co-option in chapter. Abolished in 1918, reconstituted in 1924, forbidden in 1933, it was restored in 1952.Jean-Baptiste Biot was decorated on August 16, 1850, thus joining some illustrious Frenchmen among whom Arago, Ingres, Daguerre, Fontaine, Gay-Lussac, Vernet and Guizot (Chateaubriand died in 1848, was part of the first promotion). TTB to SUP

Estimate 5 000 - 7 000 EUR

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Location of the item : France - 75009 - paris

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For sale on Wednesday 28 Apr - 13:00 (CEST)
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