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78 

Gilded beechwood "DE REPRESENTATION" CHAIR, the pedimented back carved with scrolls and a rosette, topped by a shell. The pilaster uprights are decorated with a lotus leaf, a palmette and a star. The armrests are attached to the pilaster by a scroll and are supported by winged griffins. The slightly arched belt presents in front of large laurel branches facing each other, on either side of a central finial and two others at the ends, the side belts are decorated with three finials. It rests on sabre-shaped legs ending in inner scrolls, the front legs carved with a ribbed leaf at the top. Attributed to Jacob-Desmalter Empire period (gilding, restorations) H : 104,5 - W : 66 - D : 56 cm Provenance : - Private collection - Sale Fontainebleau 5 December 2010 By its shape and its carved decoration, this armchair is close to the armchairs called "fauteuils de représentation" made for the throne rooms of Napoleon I. The indications found on this armchair are a label on which one can read "BR 1", and a label on which is written "A.J. PAR..." and "H.M EMBASS...". It is tempting to evoke for both labels the residence of the British ambassador in Paris: the Hotel de Charost bought by the Duke of Wellington in 1814 from Pauline Bonaparte. A first inventory was drawn up in 1811, which has now disappeared. On this occasion, labels in the shape of a shield with serial numbers had been affixed to the seats and furniture. A second inventory was drawn up at the time of the sale of the hotel in 1814 1: "Grand salon velours ponceau Grand canapé à chimère sculpté & doré, acorns et franges avec deux oreillers velours ponceau....3 Quatre tête- à- têtes à chimère............................................................................................4 Six grands fauteuils pareils aux tête-à-tête............................................................................6 Six medium armchairs similar to these...................................................... .......... ........... Twelve similar chairs...................................................................................................12 Five carved & gilded X chimera stools.....................................................................5 All these pieces of furniture are covered in fine gold braided pontiled velvet....................... "A third inventory, which has now disappeared, took place in 1831, and finally, a fourth inventory was drawn up in 1841.2 All the furniture and objets d'art were then given a "B.E.P." fire mark surmounted by a crown for British Embassy, Paris. The summary description of the 1814 inventory and the labels found on this seat do not allow its identification. Another hypothesis was considered based on a handwritten mention of the previous owner: he acquired this chair in 1970 directly from Laetitia Ney (1940-2005). Descendant of Marshal Michel NEY (1769-1815). The after-death inventory of Marshal Ney 3, drawn up on 27 December 1815 in his hotel located at 74 and 76 rue de Bourbon, does not describe any armchair in a sufficiently precise manner to identify it. The only mention that could be put in relation to this armchair would be: "in the large lounge lit by 3 cross windows on the terrace overlooking the quay 2 sofas with 4 feather pillows, 4 bergères with their cushions, 14 armchairs, 3 X-shaped stools, all made of dark gilded wood with horsehair and covered with crimson fabric embroidered in silver......1400 en" This armchair is to be compared with the following seats of representation listed and located: In the Throne Room of the Imperial Palace of the Tuileries, in 1804, there are: the throne chair, six armchairs, six chairs and thirty-six folding stools. For reasons of etiquette, the layout of the Throne Rooms was changed in 1806, leaving only two representative armchairs, mainly reserved for the Empress and H.M.I. Madame Mother of the Emperor, and the thirty-six folding stools. All the chairs in the Tuileries Palace are stored in the Garde-Meuble and four of the armchairs are nearby, in case of unforeseen need. The 1809 inventory records the return, since 1807, of the six chairs from the Garde-Meuble for the use of the princesses of the imperial family. According to imperial etiquette, when there are ladies in the Throne Room, the Chamberlain must ensure that "there are armchairs for LL. MM., chairs for the Princesses, and stools for the ladies. "(Title II, Chapter I, Article XI) 4. Only the Empress's Lady-in-Waiting, the Lady-in-Waiting and the ten Ladies of the Palace are allowed to enter the Throne Room. Imperial etiquette also states that "LL. MM. being placed on their throne, the Princes and Princesses sit on plians. "There is an undated note (Archives Nationales 02507, dossier 13, pièce 2) proposing, among other things, twelve additional ployants for the Palais des Tuileries. The Throne Room at the Châte

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Location of the item : France - 77300 - fontainebleau

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